W21 LAB 4代做、代写C++程序、代做c/c++编程实验

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W21 LAB 4
Local and Global variables. “Pass by value”
,
string and other library functions. 2D arrays.
Pointer basics.
Due: Feb 24 (Wednesday) 11:59 pm Total marks: 120 pts
Problem A0 Scope, Life time and Initialization of global
variables, local variables and static global/local variables
Download the files lab4A0.c and cal.c. Read the code first. Observe that for functions
that have no parameters, they are declared as functionName(void), e.g., modify (void).
It will also work if we declare them as functionNAme(), but the former is the preferred way of
declaring such functions.
Compile (how?) and run the main program.
[Scope and initialization of global variables] Observe that global variables x and y, which are
defined in cal.c, can be accessed in other file lab4A0.c (x and y have global scope), and in
order to access x and y, the other file needs to declare them using keyword extern.
Moreover, the output x:0 y:0 implies that global variables x and y, which were not
initialized explicitly, all got initialized to 0 by the complier. Also observe how the function
modify(), which was defined in cal.c, was declared and used in the other file. In declaring
a function, keyword extern is optional.
Also observe how the values of x and y are changed in function modify() using compound
operators, and how the second operation is evaluated following the operator precedence, giving
y a new value 120, not 100 or 102.
[Scope of local variables] Next, uncomment the commented printf statement, and compile
the files again. Observe the error message. The problem here is that local variable a’s scope is
the block/function in which it is defined. Here a is defined in the if block, so it is not accessible
outside the if block, even in the main function. Modify by declaring a before the if clause, i.e.,
change to int a; if (y != 0){ a = y;} Now a’s defining block is the main function, so
a’s scope is anywhere in main after its declaration, which makes it accessible after the if block.
Compile and run the program again.
[Lifetime of local variables] Uncomment the commented block near the end of main. Observe
that function aFun is called several times, and all produce the same value for counter. This is
because local variable counter in the function has life time ‘automatic’ – comes to life
(allocated in memory) when function aFun is called and vanishes (deallocated from memory)
when function aFun returns. So each time the function is call, a brand-new variable called
counter is created and initialized. Thus it always has value 100.
[Initialization of local variables] Observe the initial values of local variable b in aFun. In C and
Java, if a local variable is not explicitly initialized, it is not initialized to 0 (or, more precisely, it is
initialized with some garbage values). Run the program again and you might see different values.
2
[Lifetime of static local variables] Next, make counter a static local variable, compile and run
again. Observe that the value of counter is different in each call and its value is maintained
between the function calls, due to the fact that in C a static local variable has persistent lifetime
over function calls, similar to global variable. (Note that, a static local variable’s scope is still
within the block where it is defined. So counter is still not accessible outside the function. Try
to access counter in main and you will get compiling error.) Also observe that compound
operator += is used.
[Initialization of static local variables] Next, remove the initial value 100 for counter, compile
and run again, and observe that in the first time call counter gets an initial value 0. As
discussed in class, global variables and static local variables get initial value 0 if not initialized
explicitly. (‘Regular’ non-static local variables such as b, as we observed above, are not initialized
to 0, or, more precisely, are initialized with some garbage values).
[Scope of static global variables] Finally, make y in cal.c to be static and compile again.
Observe that global variable y becomes inaccessible in main. (But it is still accessible later in file
cal.c where it is defined.)
No submission for this question. lab3D0.c
Problem A1 variable scope, “Pass-by-value”, tracing a program
with debugger (5pts)
Specification
In order to understand variable scope and pass-by-value in C, in this exercise we trace a program
using a software tool called debugger, rather than using print statements. A debugger allows us
to examine the values of variables during program execution. With a debugger, you can do this
by setting several “breakpoints” in the program. The program will pause execution at the
breakpoints and you can then view the current values of the variables.
You will use a GNU debugger call gdb. It is a command-line based debugger but also comes with
a simple text-based gui (tui).
To debug a C program using gdb, you need to compile the program with –g flag of gcc.
Implementation
Note: for this exercise you may want to connect to lab environment, as you may not have the
same debugger on your system.
Download the program swap.c, and compile using gcc –g swap.c. Then invoke gdb by
issuing gdb –tui a.out. And then press enter key.
A window with two panels will appear. The upper panel displays the source code and the lower
panel allows you to enter commands. Maximize the terminal and use arrow keys to scroll the
upper panel so you can see the whole source code.
First, we want to examine the values of variables mainA and mainB after initialization. So we
set a breakpoint at the beginning of line 11 (before line 11 is executed) by issuing break 11.
Observe that a “b+” or ”B+” symbol appears on the left of line 11. We want to trace the values
of variables x and y defined in function swap, both before and after swapping, so we set
breakpoints at (the beginning of) line 18 and line 21. Finally we set a breakpoint at line 12 so
that we can trace the value of mainA and mainB after the function call.
When the program pauses at a breakpoint, you can view the current values of variables with the
print or display or even printf command.
3
Sample input/output
red 64 % gcc –g swap.c
red 65 % gdb –tui a.out
….
Reading symbols from a.out...done.
(gdb) break 11
Breakpoint 1 at 0x400488: file swap.c, line 11.
(gdb) break 18
Breakpoint 2 at 0x4004a3: file swap.c, line 17.
(gdb) break 21
Breakpoint 3 at 0x4004b5: file swap.c, line 21.
(gdb) break 12
Breakpoint 4 at 0x400497: file swap.c, line 12.
(gdb) run
Starting program: /eecs/home/huiwang/a.out
Breakpoint 1, main () at swap.c:11
(gdb) display mainA
mainA = ?
(gdb) display mainB
mainB = ?
(gdb) continue
Continuing.
Breakpoint 2, swap (x=1, y=20000) at swap.c:18
(gdb) display x
x = ?
(gdb) display y
y = ?
(gdb) display mainA
……?
(gdb) display mainB
……?
(gdb) continue
Continuing.
Breakpoint 3, swap (x=20000, y=1) at swap.c:21
(gdb) display x
x = ?
(gdb) display y
y = ?
(gdb) continue
Continuing.
Breakpoint 4, main () at swap.c:12
(gdb) display mainA
mainA = ?
(gdb) display mainB
mainB = ?
(gdb) display x
……?
(gdb) display y
……?
(gdb) quit
What do you get for
mainA and mainB?
/* continue execution to the
next breakpoint. Notice the
position of > sign */
What do you get for x
and y? Are they
swapped?
What do you get
for x and y?
What do you get for mainA
and mainB? Are they
swapped?
What do you get for mainA and
mainB? Are they swapped?
What do you get here, and
why?
/* run the program until the
first breakpoint. Notice the >
sign on the left of the upper
panel */
What do you get
for mainA and
mainB, and why?
4
Submission Write your answers into a text file, and submit it. Or submit a snapshot of your
gdb session. (Anything that show your work is acceptable.)
submit 2031ON lab4 text_file_or_pictures
or, use websubmit at https://webapp.eecs.yorku.ca/submit/
Problem A2 Variables (10 pts)
Specification
Complete the ANSI-C program runningAveLocal.c, which should read integers from the
standard input, and computes the running (current) average of the input integers. The program
terminates when -1 is entered.
Implementation
• Define a function void r_avg(int sum, int count)which, given the current sum
sum and the total number of input count, computes and displays the running average in
double. The current sum and input count are maintained in main.
• Complete main so that input is read and maintained. Don’t add printf statement in main.
Sample Inputs/Outputs:
red 307 % gcc –Wall runningAveLocal.c
red 308 % a.out
Enter number (-1 to quit): 10
running average is 10 / 1 = 10.000 Floor is 10 Ceiling is 10
Enter number (-1 to quit): 20
running average is 30 / 2 = 15.000 Floor is 15 Ceiling is 15
Enter number (-1 to quit): 33
running average is 63 / 3 = 21.000 Floor is 21 Ceiling is 21
Enter number (-1 to quit): 47
running average is 110 / 4 = 27.500 Floor is 27 Ceiling is 28
Enter number (-1 to quit): 51
running average is 161 / 5 = 32.200 Floor is 32 Ceiling is 33
Enter number (-1 to quit): 63
running average is 224 / 6 = 37.333 Floor is 37 Ceiling is 38
Enter number (-1 to quit): -1
red 309 %
Assume all the inputs are valid.
Submit your program using submit 2031ON lab4 runningAveLocal.c
.out or, use websubmit
Problem A3 Variables (10 pts)
Specification
Modify the above program, simplifying communications between functions.
Implementation
• download program runningAveLocal2.c.
Any name is okay
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• define a function void r_avg(int input),which, given the current input input,
computes and displays the running average. Notice that unlike the function in A2, this
function takes only one argument about current input and does not take current sum and
input count as its arguments. In such an implementation, current sum and input count are
not maintained in main. Instead, main just pass current input to r_avg(), assuming
that r_avg() somehow maintains the current sum and input count info.
• do not modify or add to the code in main().
• do not use any global variable. How can function r_avg maintain the current sum and
input count info?
Sample Inputs/Outputs:
Same as in problem A2.
Submit your program using submit 2031ON lab4 runningAveLocal2.c
or, use websubmit
Problem A4 Variables (10pts)
Specification
Modify the program above, further simplifying communications between functions by using
global variables.
Implementation
• download program runningAveGlobal.c. Complete the main()function.
• download program function.c. Complete function void r_avg(), which computes
and displays the running average. Notice that this function takes no arguments.
• define all global variables in function.c
Sample Inputs/Outputs:
Same as in problem A2.
Submit your program using
submit 2031ON lab4 runningAveGlobal.c function.c
or, use websubmit
In the rest of this lab you are going to practice using some C library functions. The simplified
prototypes of the functions covered in this week’s lecture are listed below:

int strlen(s)
s strcpy(s,s)
s strcat(s,s)
int strcmp(s,s)

int islower(int)
int isupper(int)
int isalpha(int)
int isdigit(int)
int isxdigit(int)
int tolower(int)
int toupper(int)

int atoi(s)
double atof(s)
long atol(s)
int rand(void)
int abs(int)
system(s)
exit(int)

printf()
scanf()
getchar()
putchar()
sscanf()
sprintf()
fgets()
fputs()

sin() cos()
double exp(x)
double log(x)
double pow(x,y)
double sqrt(x)
double ceil(x)
double floor(x)
6
For exact prototypes of these functions, you can either 1) issue man 3 function_name in
the terminal. 2) look at Appendix B of the required textbook.
You are encouraged to use these functions when appropriate, especially string functions
declared in as well as string-related IO functions declared in .
Don’t forget to include the corresponding header files. Moreover, if you use functions
declared in , then on the lab environment you need to link the library by using –lm
flag of gcc. That is, gcc x.c -lm
Problem B0 String manipulations, Library functions
Download file lab4B0.c. This short program first creates a character array and then uses
string library function strcpy and strcat to change the content of the array. Observe that,
• we need to include in order to use the string library functions.
• char array without initialization contains random values on some system (e.g., our lab). So
don’t assume it is initialized with all \0 characters.
• strcpy(s1, s2) always copies whole source string s2 (from the beginning to the first \0
character -- inclusive) to the beginning of destination string s1.
o strncpy(s1, s2, n) copies first n character of course string s2 to the beginning
of s1. If the first n character does not include the \0 of the s2, (i.e., n ≤
strlen(s2)), then no \0 is copied to the destination string s1.
• strcat(s1, s2) always appends whole s2 (from the beginning to the first \0 character -
- inclusive) to the end of s1. s1 may contain some characters so where is the end of s1?
Starting from beginning of the array (the left end), the first \0 in s1 is considered the end of
s1, thus the first character of s2 replaces the first \0 character in s1, gluing s1 and s2.
o strncat(s1, s2, n) appends the first n character of s2 to the end of s1. It
always adds a \0 at the end of the n character (even if n ≤ strlen(s2)),
terminating the destination string.
• strlen(s) and printf("%s",s) also treat the first \0 of s as the end of the string.
For more information about the library functions, type man followed by the function name in
your terminal (man is a Unix command that stands for ‘manual’), e.g., man strcat
No submission for problem B0.
Problem B1 String manipulations, Library functions (10 pts)
Specification
Implement your version of strcat, called my_strcat.
Implementation
Download file lab4strcat.c. This program reads two words (strings with no spaces) from
the user, stored them into arrays a and b. It then copies the inputs into another two arrays c
and d, using library function strcpy. Then it calls strcat to concatenate a and b, and calls
my_strcat to concatenate c and d. If implemented correctly, a and c should have the same
content. The program terminates when user enters two xxx.
• Implement function void my_strcat(char []). Obviously, function should not call
library function strcat. Also should not create extra temporary arrays in the function.
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• Complete the while loop so that it keeps on prompting the user for inputs, and terminates
when both two input strings are xxx, as shown in the sample output. Use strcmp library
function to check the termination condition.
Sample input, output (assume each input has less than 30 characters and contains no space.)
red 118 % a.out
hello
worlds
strcat: helloworlds
mystrcat: helloworlds
good
ok
strcat: goodok
mystrcat: goodok
hi
g
strcat: hig
mystrcat: hig
goodluck
thanks
strcat: goodluckthanks
mystrcat: goodluckthanks
xxx
good
strcat: xxxgood
mystrcat: xxxgood
yy
xxx
strcat: yyxxx
mystrcat: yyxxx
xxx
xxx
red 119 %
Submit your program using submit 2031ON lab4 lab4strcat.c
or, use websubmit
Both strcpy(s,t), strcat(s,t), and my_strcat(s,t) modify the actual array pass to the
function, by modifying s. Do you think that this is strange, given that in C everything is pass
by value? Recall that void increment(int x) or void swap(int x, int y) would never
work, as x and y are just local copies of actual arguments. Isn’t s just a local copy of the
corresponding actual argument too? Think about this, we will talk about this soon.
Problem B2 String manipulations, Library functions (15 pts)
Introduction
Consider the string library function strcmp(s,t). In Java there is a similar method
string.compareTo(s). This function determines if s lexicographically precedes t (i.e., if
s appears earlier than t in dictionary). It does so by comparing the two strings character by
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character. Issue man strcmp in the terminal , or search online resources to see how they work
in C and Java
http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/cstring/strcmp/
https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/strcmp-in-c-cpp/
https://www.programiz.com/c-programming/library-function/string.h/strcmp
https://overiq.com/c-programming-101/the-strcmp-function-in-c/
https://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/lang/String.html#compareTo-java.lang.StringSpecification
Implement your version of strcmp, called my_strcmp, which does the same comparison.
Implementation
Download file lab4strcmp.c. This program reads two strings from the user, calls library
function strcmp to compare their lexicographical ordering, and then calls function my_strcmp
to compare the lexicographic ordering again.
The program terminates when user enters two xxx.
• Implement function int my_strcmp(char []). Obviously, the function should not
call library function strcmp. Note that your function doesn’t have to return exactly the
same value as strcmp -- it needs to return a value that has the same sign as those
returned by strcmp.
• Complete the while loop so that it keeps on prompting user for inputs, and terminates when
both two input strings are xxx, as shown in the sample output. Use function strcmp or
my_strcmp to check.
Sample input and output
red 118 % a.out
apple
beast
strcmp: "apple" appears earlier in dictionary than "beast"
mystrcmp: "apple" appears earlier in dictionary than "beast"
ace
ave
strcmp: "ace" appears earlier in dictionary than "ave"
mystrcmp: "ace" appears earlier in dictionary than "ave"
exit
exam
strcmp: "exit" appears later in dictionary than "exam"
mystrcmp: "exit" appears later in dictionary than "exam"
exam
exam
"exam" and "exam" are same
"exam" and "exam" are same
exam
examine
strcmp: "exam" appears earlier in dictionary than "examine"
mystrcmp: "exam" appears earlier in dictionary than "examine"
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examination
exam
strcmp: "examination" appears later in dictionary than "exam"
mystrcmp: "examination" appears later in dictionary than "exam"
xxx
hello
strcmp: "xxx" appears later in dictionary than "hello"
mystrcmp: "xxx" appears later in dictionary than "hello"
xxx
xxx
red 119 %
Submit your program using submit 2031ON lab4 lab4strcmp.c
or, use websubmit
Problem C String manipulations, Library functions (10 pts)
Specification
Develop an ANSI-C program that reads user information from the standard inputs, and outputs
the modified version of the records.
Implementation
Download file lab4fgets.c and start from there. Note that the program
• uses loop to read inputs (from standard in), one input per line, about the user information in
the form of name age rate, where name is a word (with no space), age is an integer
literal, and rate is a floating point literal. See sample input below.
• uses fgets() to read in a whole line at a time.
As discussed earlier, since the input contains space, using scanf("%s", inputArr)
does not work here, as scanf stops at the first blank (or new line character if no space).
Consequently, if user enters Joe 2 2.3, only Joe is read in.
As mentioned in this week’s class, in order to read a whole line of input which may contain
blanks, you can use scanf("%[^\n]s",inputsArr),or, depreciated function
gets(inputsArr), but a much more common approach is to use function fgets().
Both these functions are declared in stdio.h.
fgets(inputsArr, n, stdin) reads a maximum of n characters from stdin
(Standard input) into array inputsArr.
The program should,
• after reading each line of inputs, if it is not "exit", output the original input using printf
and fputs. Notice that since fgets reads in a '\n' at the end of input, printf does not
need \n in the formatting string.
• then create a char array resu for the modified version of the input. In the modified version
of input, the first letter of name is capitalized, age becomes age + 10, and rate has 100%
increases with 3 digits after decimal point, followed by the floor and ceiling of the increase
rate. The values are separated by dashes and brackets as shown below. the
• then output the resulting string resu.
• continue reading input, until a line of exit is entered. (How
10
Hints:
• When fgets reads in a line, it appends a new line character \n at the end (before \0). Be
careful about this when checking if the input is exit.
• To create resu, you may want to tokenize the original input first. To tokenize a string,
consider sscanf
• To create resu from several variables, consider sprintf.
• If you use math library functions, be aware that the return type is double. Also if you run
the program in our lab environment, need to compile the program using -lm flag of gcc.
Sample Inputs/Outputs:
red 118 % a.out
Enter name, age and rate: sue 22 33.3
sue 22 33.3
sue 22 33.3
Sue-32-66.600-[66,67]
Enter name, age and rate: john 60 1.0
john 60 1.0
john 60 1.0
John-70-2.000-[2,2]
Enter name, age and rate: lisa 30 1.34
lisa 30 1.34
lisa 30 1.34
Lisa-40-2.680-[2,3]
Enter name, age and rate: judy 40 3.2
judy 40 3.2
judy 40 3.2
Judy-50-6.400-[6,7]
Enter name, age and rate: exit
red 119 %
Submit your program using submit 2031ON lab4 lab4fgets.c
or, use websubmit
Problem D0. 2D array, Library functions.
Download file lab4twoDarray.c. This short program demonstrates how to create, initialize
2D arrays, and access array elements. Read and run the program, and observe
• the size of the 2D arrays.
• how to access 2D arrays at cell (element) level, using [][].
• that, for char 2D array, each row is essentially a 1-d char array (i.e., a string if it is \0
terminated). So each row can be feed into string library functions and printf directly, e.g.,
strlen(b[1]) strcpy(b[2], "Hello") printf("%s", b[i]). As a
result, example, we can print the char 2D array with one loop, whereas we use two loops for
printing int 2D array.
No submission for this part, but understanding this program gets you prepared for the next two
exercise.
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Problem D1. 2D array, Library functions. (20 pts)
Specification
Write an ANSI-C program that reads user information from the standard inputs, and outputs
both the original and the modified version of the records.
Implementation
A file lab4table1.c is for you to get started. The program should:
• use a table-like 2-D array (i.e., an array of ‘strings’) to record the inputs.
• use loop and scanf("%s %s %s") to read inputs (from standard in), one input per line,
about the user information in the form of name age rate, where name is a word (with
no space), age is an integer literal, and rate is a floating point literal. See sample input
below.
• store each input string into the current available ‘row’ of the 2D array, starting from row 0.
• create a modified string of the input, and store it in the next row of the 2D array. In the
modified version of input, all letters in name are capitalized, age becomes age + 10, and
rate has 50% increases and is formatted with 2 digits after decimal point.
• continue reading input, until a name xxx is entered, followed by any age and rate values.
• after reading all the inputs, output the 2-D array row by row, displaying each original input
followed by the modified version of the input.
• display the current date and time and program name before generating the output, using
predefined pre-processor macros such as __FILE__, __TIME__ (implemented for you).

Note that as the partial implementation shows, each input line is read in as three ‘strings’ using
scanf("%s %s %s", ….). In the next question, you will practice reading in the whole line as
a string, as in lab4fgets (and then tokenize the string). Each approach has its pros and cons.
Note that you will lose all marks if, instead of a 2D-array, you use 3 parallel 1-D arrays -- one
of names, one of ages, one for wages -- to store and display information.
Sample Inputs/Outputs:
red 307 % a.out
Enter name, age and rate: john 60 1.0
Enter name, age and rate: eric 30 1.3
Enter name, age and rate: lisa 22 2.2
Enter name, age and rate: Judy 40 3.2254
Enter name, age and rate: xxx 2 2
Records generated in lab4table1.c on Feb 10 2021 13:32:48
row[0]: john 60 1.0
row[1]: JOHN 70 1.50
row[2]: eric 30 1.3
row[3]: ERIC 40 1.95
row[4]: lisa 22 2.2
row[5]: LISA 32 3.30
row[6]: Judy 40 3.2254
row[7]: JUDY 50 4.84
red 308 %
Sample Inputs/Outputs: (download file inputD.txt)
red 309 % a.out < inputD.txt
12
Enter name, age and rate: Enter name, age and rate: Enter name, age
and rate: Enter name, age and rate: Enter name, age and rate: Enter
name, age and rate:
Records generated in lab4table1.c on Feb 10 2021 13:42:03
row[0]: john 60 1.0
row[1]: JOHN 70 1.50
row[2]: Sue 30 1
row[3]: SUE 40 1.50
row[4]: Lisa 22 2.2
row[5]: LISA 32 3.30
row[6]: JuDy 40 3.22
row[7]: JUDY 50 4.83
row[8]: eric 30 1.3345
row[9]: ERIC 40 2.00
red 310
Submit your program using submit 2031ON lab4 lab4table1.c
or, use websubmit
Problem D2. 2D array, library functions. (20 pts)
Specification
Same question as problem D1 but now you read each line of input as a whole line of string.
A file lab4table2.c is created for you to get started.
As the code shows, reading a whole line allows the input to be read into a table row directly. So
you don’t have to store the original input into the table manually. The disadvantage, however, is
that you may need to tokenize the line in order to get the name, age and rate information.
Sample Inputs/Outputs:
Same output as above, except that the generated file name is lab4table2.c now, and the
time is different.
Submit your program using submit 2031ON lab4 lab4table2.c
or, use websubmit
Problem E Pointer 101 (10 pts)
Specification
Write your first (short) program that uses pointers.
Implementation
• define an integer age and initialize it to 10. Define another integer age2, which is initialized
to 100;
• define an integer pointer variable ptr, and make it point to age
• display the value of age, both via age (direct access), and
via pointer ptr (indirect access).
• use ptr to change the value of age to 14;
• confirm by displaying the value of age, both via age and via its pointer ptr
• define another pointer variable ptr2, and make it point to age2
• assign triple of age’s value to age2 via pointer ptr and ptr2 (i.e.,
without referring to age and age2). age2 is 42 now.
ptr age
*
ptr2 age2
*
13
• display the value of age2, both via age2, and via its pointer ptr2
• now let ptr2 point to age (too) by getting the address of age
from pointer variable ptr (i.,e., without using &age)
• confirm by displaying the value of ptr2’s pointee via ptr2
• display value of age, both from age, and via ptr and ptr2.
• use ptr2 to decrease the value of age by 1. age is 13 now.
• display value of age, both from age, and via ptr and ptr2.
• finally, display the address of age, using printf("%p %p %p\n",&age,ptr,ptr2);
Notice that here we print prt and ptr2 directly. This displays the content of the pointer
variables, which is the address of age (in Hex).
Sample Inputs/Outputs:
red 305 % a.out
age: 10 10
age: 14 14
age2: 42 42
ptr2’s current pointee: 14
age: 14 14 14
age: 13 13 13
0x7ffd04a92bcc 0x7ffd04a92bcc 0x7ffd04a92bcc
red 306
Submission:
Name your program lab4pointer.c and submit using
submit 2031ON lab4 lab4pointer.c
or, use websubmit
In summary, in this lab you should submit
File_for_the_degugger_problem
runningAveLocal.c runningAveLocal2.c
runningAveGlobal.c function.c
lab4strcat.c lab4strcmp.c
lab4fgets.c
lab4table1.c lab4table2.c
lab4pointer.c
You can submit using websubmit at https://webapp.eecs.yorku.ca/submit/
o Login using you eecs user name
o If you keep on getting passport York login page when following the link, clear the
browsing history, cache and cookie of your browser, and then try the link again.
You may want to issue submit -l 2031ON lab4 to view the list of files that you have
submitted.
ptr2 age2
*
ptr age
*
You will get different
numbers here but they should
be identical to each other.
This is the memory address of
variable age, in Hex.
Lower case L
Any name is okay
14
Common Notes
All submitted files should contain the following header:
/***************************************
* EECS2031ON – Lab4 *
* Author: Last name, first name *
* Email: Your email address *
* eecs_username: Your eecs login username *
* York num: Your York student number
****************************************/
In addition, all programs should follow the following guidelines:
• Include the stdio.h library in the header of your .c files.
• Assume that all inputs are valid (no error checking is require ed).